femmed.com
Shop manMED
Ship to

What do you do when you can’t get past your GP to a specialist?

Posted | 0 comments

So I had my visit to my GP last week… it’s taken me a week to cool down enough to blog about it with somewhat less emotionally… A new doctor was there subbing for my usual one who is on mat leave. So I thought, “great! a new guy! maybe I’ll get somewhere”. I riffled off my perimenopausal symptoms and he immediately agreed that I was bang on the money in determining that I indeed am in perimenopause. Great. At least some acknowledgment. So, I asked him if he’d refer me to an endocrinologist (in Canada we can make a move without a referral. We can’t just call one up on our own, we have to go through the GP gatekeepers). Anyway, he said, no I’ll do your blood work first because they’ll ask me for that before they’ll even see you. He then went on to admit that my hormones levels would likely be in the normal range, but that at least we’d have a baseline to work with for the future. So I said, great, let’s do it. So we did. (I couldn’t even get my other GP to even do the hormone level tests, so this seems like major steps forward for me). One week later, surprise surprise, the hormone levels come back in the “normal” range. We expected that right? Right. So what does he do? He tells me, no I can’t refer you to an endocrinologist or a gyno because your levels have to be abnormal before they’ll take you. And from the GP level, he doesn’t think there’s anything he can do other than put me on the Pill or give me antidepressants. Fabulous choices! Pardon my French but WTF!!!. So if I can’t get past the gatekeeper, I can’t help or medically explore the perimenopausal symptoms I have now. I have to wait until I’m in full menopause before a doctor can help me. That’s ridiculous!!!!!!!! I am furious. So plan B… I made an appointment with a new GP. I’m hoping that she’ll have a more progressive approach to this. I can’t possibly be the only woman to experience early perimenopause. I know I’m not because I talk to you guys on Twitter and I know you feel my pain. A couple of blogs ago, I mentioned that I had an appointment with a naturopathic doctor. I had canceled that appointment because I had that blood work done with my GP and I didn’t want to confuse matters. But I guess I’ll rebook that as it seems to be one of my only options now. I’m annoyed by the system and it’s reactionary methods. I know what I have NOW and I want to deal with it NOW, not later when it’s worse. Is anyone else in this boat with me or am I rowing it alone? Sara Sara Purves Sara...

Read More

Never make important decisions while you have PMS

Never make important decisions while you have PMS

Posted | 0 comments

Top ten list of things never to do while you have PMS. Here we go: 10. Never decide to radically change your hair! (I did this yesterday… I could cry!) 9. Never prompt a discussion with your husband/boyfriend about ANYTHING relationship oriented. And for Gods sake if you feel like leaving him – wait a week and see if you feel the same way. 8. Never decide that it’s a good time to talk to your boss about your job. 7. Never go to a family function. 6. Never offer to babysit for anyone. (if you have kids already- you’ll hear me on that one). 5. Never get into a car accident. There will definitely be news coverage of the brawl too! 4. Never start a chocolate-free diet when you are PMSing. You’re just asking for failure. 3. Do not talk to your kid’s coach about why she sat on the bench all game and you drove an hour to the game to watch her sit. 2. Never go shopping with your spouse or significant other. 1. Never go shopping for a bathing suit when you have PMS! Depending on what’s puffy, probably not a good time to go shopping for anything Thanks to everyone who helped finish the list for me!!! Sara Purves Sara attended the Claude Watson School for the Arts, a prestigious Toronto based high school for gifted creative students. She then moved on to the Ontario College of Art and Design for 4 years where she majored in Environmental Design. After graduation in 1993, Sara pursued many creative arenas including: retail store design, fashion design, had gallery exhibitions of her paintings, and volunteered in many areas of the arts before settling into a career in graphic design. Sara was employed as art director and graphic designer at several well known advertising agencies and creative design shops where she worked with a variety of clients. Sara is also someone who’s unwillingly entered early perimenopause and muddles her way through frustrations and...

Read More

When will peri-menopause be accepted as a regular stage of life?

Posted | 0 comments

Besides the hormonal imbalance, the array of emotions and other side effects of peri-menopause, the one thing that I think bothers me most is the lack of acceptance and understanding of it as a legit condition. I have a fruit allergy…I’m allergic to “tree fruit”… so apples, peaches, pears etc. When I tell people that they automatically don’t want to believe this is possible. For the life of me, I don’t know why this is so hard to believe. It’s especially predominant in older generations. “In my day we ate what we were given and we liked it!” They proceed to try to feed me fruit because the allergy must be all in my head…. Whatever! Tell it to my Epi-Pen. Anyway, where am I going with this you say… the reaction of disbelief in my fruit allergy is the same one I get when I say that I am going through peri-menopause. Total disbelief, the assumption that I am making it up or looking for a reason for my symptoms. Why is this concept so hard to believe? Medical science backs it up. Doctors are aware of it. All the symptoms are there. So why the mental obstacle? Folks should take a minute to reflect back on their mothers between the ages of 40 and 60. Do you think she could have benefited from some hormone therapy or some doctor’s advice or any other help to get her sanely through that time? Come on, I bet if you thought hard about it, you’d notice that she may have been a little “off”. It’s also funny that we have to convince our own family doctors to explore this as a possibility. I’m slightly annoyed that I have to go to the doctor armed with print outs and books to back up my conviction in this. One day the stage of peri-menopause will be as common place as adolescence and menopause. It will just be a regular, accepted stage that we’re all aware of and we’re be ready for it rather than confused for years and years before finally sorting it out. Until next time. Sara Purves Sara attended the Claude Watson School for the Arts, a prestigious Toronto based high school for gifted creative students. She then moved on to the Ontario College of Art and Design for 4 years where she majored in Environmental Design. After graduation in 1993, Sara pursued many creative arenas including: retail store design, fashion design, had gallery exhibitions of her paintings, and volunteered in many areas of the arts before settling into a career in graphic design. Sara was employed as art director and graphic designer at several well known advertising agencies and creative design shops where she worked with a variety of clients. Sara is also someone who’s unwillingly entered early perimenopause and muddles her way through frustrations and...

Read More